The Nauseator

^The Nauseator from James . See Strava map here.

You know those people. You love to ride with them. They have been at many of your most memorable rides and yet, when you drive into the parking lot where the ride starts, and you see them there,  you get that queasy feeling because you just know, “This is going to hurt.”

Still, you can’t wipe that smile off your face. You know it’s going to hurt but it’s also going to be a blast. This was one of those rides. I knew the area so I knew what would happen when we hit this road. It’s mostly flat with shallow rollers so the Tempo Monsters love it. There was a group on the road that had left before us and we caught and passed some of them. Some would jump on our wheel and go for a ride and some continued on their own workout. Or maybe they were saving it for another segment?

And speaking of segments, I set a PR on this. There were some nice pulls from the group and I felt great during mine but it’s not the same as when you do it solo or pull the whole thing. But it’s going to be a long time before I do that speed on my own so training with these animals can only help. If they don’t kill me first…..

 

 

 

Coffee Run

^Coffee Run from James . Strava map here.

There was no warm up. Twenty to twenty-five right from the start. Why? They wanted coffee. Must have coffee.

This is a ride that George and Ela use for training. I joined them for the company since I like that area. It was a great workout. I drafted for most of the ride since I’m not much of a Tempo Monster, but then, that’s exactly why I needed this. Thanks to George for pulling us the whole time. It was probably the only way he could get a workout!

Starbucks was the half way point and if we wanted, we could have some coffee or something good to munch on. The ride was about 35 miles of tempo intervals with some nice rolling climbs for good measure. It’s a great area and has some nice “stingers” that can be added when needed. I’ve got more video of the area so stay tuned and George, you’re in the next one. Anyway,  I posted this video to show that going down hill can be fun too. It’s not going up, but it ain’t bad.

The Beast

^The Beast Part I from James . See Strava map here.

This video is of a century ride we did a while back. Luis, a friend of mine, was doing his first 100 miler. Now in my opinion, a century in the middle of summer, with 100 degree temperatures is not the way to go. However, if you add 4,000 feet of climbing, well, then it’s ok. So off we went.

Not everyone was doing the century, but for those of us that were, there was plenty of company at the start. The problem with that is that those doing the shorter route started playing from mile one. And of course, I got drawn into it. I had fun, played on most of the route and finished 97 miles feeling great. The last three however, were grueling. It’s funny how everything turned against me at the end. The heat, the pace, the hills and of course, the distance. Those last 3 miles lasted forever. I don’t know how Luis felt or what he thought of his first century or how the others felt but I was wasted which made everyone else look fresh.

I think everyone enjoyed the ride. Everyone was probably tired, except Joe, who may not have even warmed up and went on to do more, but that’s another story. The challenge was fun and at the end we all felt we had accomplished something. Like they say, you discover something about yourself when you face your demons, when you push to your limits.   I can honestly say, that what I discovered was that riding for 97 miles can be a blast, but riding 100, well, that can be a beast.

Hot Rod Syndrome

^Hot Rod Syndrome from James . Part one here.

Do you have trouble riding at a steady tempo? I do. Maybe I suffer from HRS.  I think I got it from the motorcycles I’ve had. What is it? It’s the inability to resist the temptation to speed up every time you see that perfect section of road.

See Strava map here. See related video The Pain Train.

Maybe that’s why people like segments on Strava. They all seem to be the perfect time to “open it up”. And they just can’t resist! You know you should pace yourself,  but how can you not “enjoy” the little segment in front of you?  How can you not want to play? Of course, your tempo suffers as a result. It goes up and down and keeps taking you close to the edge and that, of course, is not the way to complete a long ride. Maybe that’s why I don’t like long rides.

That’s why  I like to get up front and work. If done right, you set an even steady tempo. It’s not about how fast you go, it’s about being steady and keeping everyone together. What could possibly be better to treat HRS than a solid, steady tempo? I just can’t seem to do it very well. Every curve in the road looks like the perfect place to “ramp it up”. So does every straight and every down hill. And let’s not talk about the climbs. They’re all perfect.

I’m working on it and getting better. I know that being the camera guy doesn’t help. It keeps me going forward and backward to get everyone in the video and then I move on to the next group.That takes my tempo all over the place. Maybe I should see it,  not as a syndrome, but as a quality. Something needed by the camera guy in order to get everyone in the video. I don’t know whether it’s good or bad to have this syndrome but I do know this: everywhere I look,  I see a great segment and I think, “Maybe we should speed it up just a little bit, so we can enjoy it a little more”. I may have to go slow for the rest of the ride in order to pay for it, but what the hell, it’s worth it.

All But One

^All But One from James .

This video is from our ride out to Edge Falls. We had thirteen people out for some fun. We got what we wanted. It’s great route of 53 miles and 2200 feet of hills. What made it hard, however, was the Texas heat. At the end it was 100 degrees.

What we see in this video is mile 3. I usually start at the end and move up and get everyone in the first video. It doesn’t always work out since groups can be rather large at times but with smaller groups like this, it’s usually easy.

Not this time though. My friend Sean was in front of me and I just couldn’t get in front of him before the second down hill. Sean and I have worked together in the last several rides so I may have video with him in it. I still have much video to go through, so Sean, be patient, you’re in there somewhere!

If you want to see the map click on Strava .

RWB Team Ride

^Where’s Waldo? from James . Strava

A while back I went on a ride with Team RWB out on River Road. It was a great ride of 35 miles with about 1300 ft of climbing. It took us on River Road which is always nice when there’s little traffic, and it also went on some easy rollers up by the dam. The thing about River Road is that during the summer it has very heavy traffic so it’s best to avoid it. The rest of the year, however, it’s great.

Another thing to keep in mind is that if you need some climbing there are plenty of nice rollers in the area. Most of the highways have good shoulders too and if you know where to go, the quiet roads are really nice. You can click on the Strave link above if you want to see the route. Have fun out there!

 

The HEB La Vernia Ride

^Give Me Air! from James.  Strava map.

Last weekend I joined the HEB club for a 53 mile ride starting at The Den in La Vernia, Texas. A mostly flat ride, it has some great, quiet country roads that everyone enjoyed.

The video above will show you what some of the roads are like. I tried to get everyone doing the 53 miler in the video but I may have missed some. However, I still have more video to go through. Stay tuned!

Moving Pictures-The Eagle Ride

^Moving Pictures-Eagle Ride from James. Strava map.

Not one to post still pictures (thus, the name Moving Pictures) I’m posting this video to show some of the people that rode the Eagle Ride 40 miler. This was hosted by Team Red White and Blue with Cyclones, Team BGDB, 700c Club and Performance Bike pitching in to help. I’m sure there were other clubs that worked because I saw many different club jerseys. I also know that there were many folks that helped that are not members of any club but made this ride not only possible, but a great event.

I rode the 40 miler with some old and some new friends and had a blast. This area is mostly flat with mellow rollers so for the 40 miles we had about 750 feet of climbing. We also had a head wind going out on this out and back course.

It was raining at my house in the morning and my usual rule of thumb is that if it’s raining at my house I won’t go. But I really wanted to ride so I went anyway. Good thing I did. The day cleared up and there was no rain on the ride. Great people and great ride. Thanks to all that made it happen!