“Oh Fudge!”

^Oh Fudge from James . Click on Strava for the map.

Have you ever not paid attention for just one second and had a close call? I had one of those out at Madrone a while back. I was looking back for the guy following me and when I turned back I was face to face with another drop. It wasn’t a big deal, but I was slightly off the trail and didn’t see it. My life didn’t flash before me. It’s too long and boring. But it did give me an adrenaline rush.

The trails out there are great. They’re rough and rocky and technical for my skill level. I’m usually following whoever I go with and as you can see in the video, they are no where in sight. But that’s ok. It was a perfect day with good friends. What more can you ask for? How about not going over the handle bars for starters…..

Tovar Torture Test

 

^Tovar Torture Test from James on Vimeo.

This is a video of  a great mountain bike ride I had at Mac. It was just two of us so it was easy to adjust to each others pace and we managed 25 miles.  We did tempo with just a few short stops  and ended the ride with some hill intervals.

We did come up on some riders out there. They’re in the video but I don’t know them. They were doing their own pace so we joined them for a few minutes and then went on our way.

Strava map.

Everyone looks for something different from cycling. Health, fitness, maybe recreation. We were looking for three things and we found them. Oxygen, adrenaline and endorphins.

 

Scrambled Legs

 

^Scrambled Legs from James on Vimeo.

Strava. It’s a love it or hate it thing, isn’t it? Me? I love it. When you do a lot of training on your own it’s a great way to see how you’re doing. You can see your time on different segments, plot routes or see other’s rides that you may want to try. And something I really like is that when you plot a ride it shows you how many feet of climbing there are in the ride. Pretty cool, right?

Strava map.

The cool thing about the segments is that you can compare your ride to previous rides you did there. You can also compare it to anyone that has ridden that segment before. And even cooler than that, you can compare it only to your friends that you follow. Even though you’re training by yourself, if you’re like me, you’re chasing that one guy ahead of you and trying to stay ahead of the person chasing you. It’s just another training tool for us to use.

The video attached to this post is a short one showing a segment we did at Mac. Everywhere you ride there are Strava segments. You can even set some up yourself if there’s a section you really like. Whoever set up the Scrambled Legs segment in the video picked a cool one. I always liked that section. And thanks to Jason, my friend in the video, I set a new PR! What can be better than that?

 

 

 

Chest Mounted Camera Test

 

Chest Mount Test from James on Vimeo.

I have some mountain bike and gravel bike video with the camera mounted to the seat post and the handle bars. It’s very shaky. This video mounts the camera on a chest strap. The video is not bad with this system but obviously I can’t use the old Garmin Elite since it is cigar shaped. The video was taken at McAllister Park. I ran into a couple of guys from the Storm club which was convenient since I needed a reference. One thing about this chest mounted camera is trying to get the angle right. It’s hit or miss and can change as you ride so you have to keep track of it.

Strava map.

The bigger question is how do I mount the rear facing camera? The seat tube works ok on the road but I ride a hard tail and I don’t think it will work out on the trail. I like that view better as it shows the suffering on the riders face and we know cycling is about suffering, right? Anyone have any ideas? Oh, and can you guess the trail?